Lasik Laser and PRK Eye Surgery iNews and iGossip

  1. Laser Eye Surgery May Be Safer than Contact Lenses
  2. Tiger Woods and Laser Eye Surgery (USA Today, The Los Angeles Times)
  3. Custom PRK improves vision more than custom LASIK eye surgery for myopia (the OSN SuperSite December 11, 2009)
  4. Surface ablation: PRK and Lasek eye surgery is the most common laser eye surgery procedure in US military
  5. The best laser eye surgery results in Ireland – 99.9% of people achieved 20/20 vision (8 April 2010)
  6. Laser eye surgery treatments are low-risk, painless and rapid. So what are we afraid of, wonders Zoe Strimpel
  7. Sports Enthusiasts Choosing Laser Eye Surgery
  8. I can see clearly now: How Laser Eye Surgery opened Mark Silver’s eyes (25/09/2009, Mirror, UK)
  9. New trend in Laser Eye Surgery tailors eyesight to profession, lifestyle (SmartPlanet)
  10. Sir Paul McCartney and Eye Exercises
  11. Laser Eye Surgery Safe Long-Term: Study (the journal Archives of Ophthalmology, November 2009)
  12. Vision stable with PRK out to 14 years, study finds (ASN SuperSite, June, 2009)
  13. Watch out, Lasik eye surgery (EyeWorld, October 2009)
  14. Giving you the right sight for sore eyes (London Evening Standard)
  15. CrossRoads on Laser Eye Surgery
  16. Surgery gives gift of ‘HD’ sight (Sky News, 4 December 2009)
  17. Take this Vision Quiz to see if you need an appointment to see us
  18. Test your Vision with CaleidoMaze
  19. My ReStored Eyes – American Ophthalmologist talks about Multi-Focal IOLs in his eyes (10 October 2009)
  20. Study shows spike in myopia prevalence from 1971 to 2004 (Arch Ophthalmology. 2009;127(12))
  21. Expert hopes ‘fourth-generation’ refractive procedures address limitations of LASIK, surface ablation
  22. Myopic patients report quality of life similar to emmetropes after Refractive Surgery
  23. Can eating carrots improve your eyesight? (ABC Health)
  24. Eye Exercises and Vision for your IPhone – vision AppZap
  25. Should Laser Eye Surgery Be Considered a Performance Enhancer?
Laser Eye Surgery May Be Safer than Contact Lenses

AnEyeOnTheBlinkUK

Researchers who reviewed several studies of complications from both contact lenses and Laser Eye Surgery have concluded that Laser Eye Surgery may actually be the safer option, in the long run.

Of course, like any surgery, Laser Eye Surgery has its risks. But they calculated the risk of significant loss of vision to be 1 in 10,000 (0.01%).

Compare that to contact lens wearers who have approximately a 1 in 100 (1.0%) risk of developing a serious contact lens-related eye infection over 30 years of use.

They also have about a 1 in 2,000 (0.05%) chance of significant vision loss as a result of a contact lens-related eye infection over the same period.

Direct comparison is difficult, as complications due to surgery are evident immediately, whereas the risks associated with contact lens accumulate over years. But they concluded that almost all contact lens wearers suffer some form of infection, even if the proper lens wear and lens care guidelines are followed.

The Medical Journal of Australia has also reported that coloured and novelty contact lenses lead to unsafe practices such as wearing lenses overnight, sharing of lenses, and poor lens hygiene.

Contact lens wearers should have an assessment at Medownick Laser Clinic, to see if Laser Eye Surgery is the better option for them.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Tiger Woods and Laser Eye Surgery (USA Today, The Los Angeles Times)

Tiger_Woods_drives_by_AllisonTiger Woods is arguably the most notable athlete to undergo Laser Eye Surgery  in 1999. Woods had the procedure because he could not see clearly without glasses. He had severe myopia. Woods was so short-sighted that he had “counting fingers” vision. He could only count his fingers about a foot away from his face.   He has had a number of enhancements since then and is now reported as having better than 20/20 vision. In Tiger’s case he had a severe sight problem in his younger years but the treatments have not only corrected the problem but given him a sharper focus than the norm.

Would it help to have such vision, particularly in Tiger’s case for his putting? Well the vision changes may not be the sole reason, but before his first Laser Vision Procedure Tiger had lost 16 straight tournaments, while after surgery he won five straight events and the next four majors beginning with the 2000 US Open!

Other golfers to have similar surgery include Tom Lehman, Mike Weir, Scott Hoch, Hale Irwin, Laura Davies and Tom Kite. The Los Angeles Times quotes Woods as saying that he is able to see slopes in greens a lot clearer. The same Newspaper reported that in case of Lehman, Laser Eye Surgery improved his ability to judge distances while Tiger’s eye surgeon was quoted as saying that the Laser eye surgery gives golfers a different three-dimensional view of the green. USA Today reported that Woods has worn contacts that corrected his vision, but he had problems due to allergies. It was reported that the wind caused his eye to tear up and that sometimes his contacts rotated during his backswing. The article described that his vision after Laser Eye Surgery improved to the point, where the hole looked bigger and the breaks (in the greens} were accentuated more. Woods’s doctor says Woods isn’t imagining magnification. He says it’s real because he’s no longer experiencing the “minification” effect of contact lenses or obstruction of peripheral vision. “For your entire life, your brain believes that it is normal when actually it’s about 7-10% smaller than actual size”.

Golfers are notorious competitors, and anything that can give them a competitive edge, like good natural vision, seems to be reasonable.

And it’s not only the golfers. In baseball a number of batters have undergone Refractive surgery. It doesn’t take much imagination to realise what a decided difference it could make when you’re trying to hit a fastball. The same would apply in cricket. What an advantage to a top order batsman when facing a Brett Lee, Jeff Thomson or Malcolm Marshall to have better than 20/20 vision.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Custom PRK improves vision more than custom LASIK eye surgery for myopia (the OSN SuperSite December 11, 2009)

aaaEye for HD VisionWavefront-guided PRK with mitomycin C proved more effective than custom LASIK in correcting moderate Myopia (Nearsightedness), according to a study.

The prospective clinical trial included 88 eyes of 44 patients with moderate myopia who underwent PRK in one eye and LASIK in the contralateral eye.  PRK eyes and Lasik eyes had similar clinical characteristics before Laser Eye Surgery.

A total of 42 patients completed 1 year of follow-up. Study data showed excellent vision in 74% of PRK eyes and 64% of LASIK eyes at 1 year after surgery.

PRK eyes attained better uncorrected visual acuity and best corrected visual acuity than LASIK eyes; the differences were statistically significant (P = .03 and P < .001, respectively). Both groups had similar spherical equivalent, according to the study.

PRK eyes showed no clinically significant haze. LASIK eyes had greater higher-order aberrations and lower contrast sensitivity than PRK eyes. The differences were statistically significant (P = .01 and P < .05, respectively), the study authors reported.

(Br J Ophthalmol. 2009;93(12):1634-1638.)

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Surface ablation: PRK and Lasek eye surgery is the most common laser eye surgery procedure in US military

(OCULAR SURGERY NEWS U.S. EDITION March 25, 2010)

a_manWithWaterOnGlassesMore than 312,000 laser refractive procedures performed in the U.S. Air Force, Army and Navy have provided invaluable insight about laser refractive surgery to both military and civilian communities. Since the first military laser study began in 1993 and the U.S. Department of Defence adopted laser refractive surgery in 2000, military laser refractive cases have demonstrated safety, efficacy and excellent visual results when performed in appropriate patients.

U.S. Navy Capt. David J. Tanzer, MD, said. “We’re looking at safety and efficacy of [military] war fighters, so we want to ensure that these procedures are safe. .”

Known as a “force enhancer” or “force extender” in military parlance, refractive surgery is considered a life-saving procedure in all branches of the U.S. military.

“Refractive surgery has been revolutionary in the military,” Dr. Schallhorn said. “Nothing short of revolutionary, as far as what it can offer active duty members. Put simply, it can enhance battlefield safety and improve the performance of our military personnel.”

In the Army, both PRK and LASIK are waived for most service personnel. LASIK is performed in the Army; however, surface ablation, such as PRK and LASEK, is the preferred procedure to be performed on combat-bound soldiers and others in special operations.

Military laser refractive surgery is voluntary and based on FDA guidelines for patient selection. Patients are carefully screened and provided a detailed informed consent before refractive surgery, the same as with civilian populations.

The most common laser procedure performed in all branches of the military is PRK, while LASIK has been gaining in popularity in recent years. In some Army laser refractive centers, up to 30% of procedures are LASIK.

Dr. Tanzer said refractive surgery has also improved vision in demanding environments, including underwater and in the air. For example, he performed PRK on the first F-18 pilot to have refractive surgery and then land on board an aircraft carrier. Subsequently, he was a passenger in a plane piloted by that patient to assess results of the surgery.

The pilot successfully landed the plane on an aircraft carrier for a night re-qualifying run with his surgeon in the backseat.

“As we were flying to the ship that night, he related to me that he had never seen the carrier or the landing lights better,” Dr. Tanzer said. “You can well imagine that vision is the critical sense when it comes to landing aircraft, let alone landing an aircraft on a pitching deck of an aircraft carrier.”

Find out if you are suitable for Laser Eye Surgery Vision Correction at the Medownick Laser Eye Surgery Clinic today.

Want to know more? Book your Free Laser Eye Surgery assessment online now at Medownick.

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The best laser eye surgery results in Ireland – 99.9% of people achieved 20/20 vision (8 April 2010)

an eye for inner most thoughtsIt has been independently verified that 99.9 per cent of people who had the Advanced Wavefront treatment achieved 20/20 vision. The Advanced Wavefront is the most advanced laser eye treatment by Ireland’s specialist in laser eye surgery.

This was confirmed by a study on binocular vision on all Advanced Wavefront treatment results.
Laser eye surgery is growing at a rapid rate in Ireland and Irish sports stars such as Brian O’Driscoll, Paul O’Connell, and Padraig Harrington have had this simple life changing procedure.

To find out if you too can enjoy better than 20/20 vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Laser eye surgery treatments are low-risk, painless and rapid. So what are we afraid of, wonders Zoe Strimpel

I can see clearly now – thanks to ten minutes with a laser surgeon

Tuesday, 23rd March 2010 (cityam.com)
ASK around, and you’ll suddenly find that everyone you know either knows someone who has just had laser eye surgery, or they’re about to have it done themselves. It’s like with pop star Lily Allen – she had a big online presence for ages, but nobody one knew had ever actually heard of her. Until suddenly overnight, we were all humming her tunes.
After 20 years of existence (a bit like Lily Allen), laser eye surgery is finally becoming the cool kid on the block, accepted by the in crowd, the out crowd, and pretty much everyone who would once have balked at such a procedure.
“A lot of adults remember growing up hearing it was all new and crazy. Now we’re getting people who have grown up hearing about it working out – and the results are improving all the time.”
WHAT IT DOES
Laser correction surgery reshapes the cornea so that it changes the focal point of the eye. Ideally, the focal point is changed so that it focuses perfectly on the retina, just like a normal eye. With short-sightedness, rays of light from a distant object are focused in front of the retina. This is either because the eye is too long or the cornea is too steeply curved and so has too much focusing power (or a combination of these factors). The laser flattens out the cornea, thus restoring perfect focus.
MYTHS AND RISKS
People fear blindness, infection, black spots, everlasting dryness, floaters, and the possibility that you will be back to square one 10 years down the line. It’s scary, tinkering with your eyes (the window to the soul, after all), so it’s no wonder we catastrophise the surgery.

The reality is quite different. David Gartry, ophthalmic consultant surgeon and refractive service director at Moorfields Eye Hospital, says: “It’s a great shame to be put off by risk – in terms of infection it’s safer than contact lenses. As for permanent damage to the vision that can’t be corrected – that is amazingly rare. Four per cent of patients have an extra procedure, simply because no surgeon anywhere can tell someone beforehand it’ll certainly succeed. I get a whole load of bankers, lawyers, actuaries and so forth in my Saturday clinic. By Sunday, their vision is better than driving standard – by Monday it’s 20/20.” John Hughes of Ultralase goes so far as to say: “No one has ever gone blind from undergoing laser eye surgery anywhere in the world.”

To find out if you too can enjoy better than 20/20 vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Sports Enthusiasts Choosing Laser Eye Surgery

By Adam Singleton (ezinearticles.com)

Ezine ArticleIf you’re an active kind of person, you’ll know how good it feels to workout. However, if you’re also a wearer of contacts or glasses, you’re also sure to know how annoying it can be to deal with these vision aids when all you want to do is run a few miles on the treadmill or take part in your favourite sport. While you may find there are some pursuits that can be enjoyed without glasses, swimming can be one, there are plenty of activities that require keen observation and accurate vision, meaning people without twenty-twenty vision can find themselves stuck with trying to accommodate their glasses or contacts.

While you might not find wearing glasses too tricky for a sport like golf, it’s a very different story when it comes to something like rugby, few pairs of glasses would survive a few scrums! What’s more, if you’re likely to get hot and sweaty when working out or indulging in your favourite sport you’ll know what it feels like to have your glasses struggling to stay balanced on your slippery nose. Therefore, it’s little wonder that so many professional sports people and enthusiasts have turned to laser eye surgery to enhance their performance or greater enjoy their workouts.

Being able to dispose with the need for contacts or glasses can be a real boon for people who are passionate about keeping fit, allowing them to see clearly when swimming or running and taking away the worry about breaking glasses or losing contacts during a rough workout. Some celebrities who’ve had laser eye surgery include Scottish rugby stars Max Evans and Marcus Di Rollo as well as Olympic rower Tom Solesbury. Candidates for laser eye surgery have to be over 18, and choosing to correct vision in this way is a popular choice for promising young athletes or sportsmen who would otherwise be held back in their chosen fields.

However, it’s important to remember that you should avoid sports for a short period of time when having laser eye surgery, so it’d a good idea to look ahead on your calendar before booking an appointment. This is because it’s best to give your eyes a good amount of time to heal before taking part in anything rough or potentially dangerous. Luckily the recovery time is short and most people can be back to playing sports two weeks after surgery. It’s recommended to wait a month before taking part in any aquatic sports though. However, compared to a lifetime of improved vision, many people think laser eye surgery is worth it!

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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I can see clearly now: How Laser Eye Surgery opened Mark Silver’s eyes (25/09/2009, Mirror, UK)

AEyesForArticleUKI can see clearly now: How laser eye surgery opened Mark Silver’s eyes for the first time in 30 years

By Mark Silver 25/09/2009  (Mirror, UK)

I remember bursting into tears the moment I found out I needed glasses. Well, I was only nine at the time.
But when I first put them on a week later, I think I had the biggest grin in town.

Even 31 years later, I can clearly recall the feeling of elation I had as I stared at the cinema across the road, about 60 yards from the opticians.

I could actually see what films were on. Before I’d had to go right up to within a few feet to have a clue what films were showing.

That same feeling of finding a whole new world came back to me when I had laser eye surgery in July. It was amazing.

For the first time since I was about five years old, I could see pretty much perfectly without any help – no specs or contact lenses in sight!

Naturally such a massive change took a bit of getting used to.

For a few weeks after the treatment, people must have thought I was mad as I pushed my finger up the outside of my nose, trying to put my glasses back in place.

But since the op there is nothing odd looking about how I check if it’s time to get out of bed.

No more sticking the alarm clock right in front of my nose, stressing about whether I have to shift myself.

Now I can smugly turn my head slightly to the side every morning and I can see the time perfectly. It’s such a novelty – and less of a panic.

And no longer am I blind as a bat when I take my two young daughters to the local swimming baths. I can relax because I can see clearly where they are in the pool.

These are just a couple of the perks –and to think I was in two minds about having the surgery in the first place.

The whole procedure was safe, smoothly carried out and the follow-up treatment was great.

I was short-sighted and somewhere in the middle of the scale.

During the procedure some tissue was removed from the front part of my eye and the cornea, or the front surface, was reshaped. 

Incredibly, the whole thing lasted a matter of minutes and within a few hours my vision was excellent.

The procedure itself was a bit uncomfortable at the start because of the pressure from a plastic suction ring over each eye to hold them open. But there was never any pain.
Opticians have carried out tens of thousands of these treatments and the safety aspect is well established.
On the day of the surgery they took me into a small operating theatre and gave me a local anaesthetic.
It means you’re fully awake and aware of everything when the laser is applied.
I suffer mildly from claustrophobia so I did have one or two moments of anxiety because the laser equipment and staff are right over you.
Jonathan Carr, the surgeon performing my correction at the Harley Street clinic, is not only brilliant with eyes, but also people.
He sensed I was feeling a bit anxious and was able to distract me as best he could by chatting non-stop about my favourite subject, travel.
He later told me that in his 13 years of refractive surgery he has treated many patients who were nervous because of claustrophobia, but they all got through it. Still, this would be my only word of caution about having it done, be aware of that.
The aftercare was also top notch.
After surgery, a nurse talked me through the next week and I was given three bottles of drops to take over that time. I also got goggles for sleeping to protect my eyes.
It’s important to get straight home after the surgery to lie down and let your eyes rest for a good few hours.
Taking the drops in those hours immediately after the surgery was difficult to say the least because my eyes were really swollen and heavy. But I persevered and things soon became easier.
Steve Schallhorn, the chairman of the Optical Express International Medical Advisory Board, is known as one of the best and most respected refractive surgeons out there.
He surprised me by saying that wearing contacts is a greater risk than this eye surgery because of the chance of eye infections, allergies and dry eye.
Steve assured me my vision correction for distance is permanent.
I knew before I went through with the surgery that I will probably need reading glasses in just a few years. The particular eye muscle involved deteriorates more rapidly when you hit 45.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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New trend in Laser Eye Surgery tailors eyesight to profession, lifestyle (SmartPlanet)

aawomanEyeLooksUpforProfessionals2A new trend is emerging at the forefront of laser eye surgery: patients who want to tailor their eyesight to suit their lifestyle or profession, hoping for a bespoke optical edge in their field.

Are you a hunter who could use better long-range vision? There’s a laser eye surgery procedure for that.

Are you a tailor who needs to optimize your vision to the short distance between you and your textiles? There’s a surgical procedure for that.

Are you a long-haul trucker and need eyesight that’s optimized for the road and the night? There’s a surgical procedure for that, too.

Laser refractive surgery is traditionally used to alter the shape of the cornea to correct myopia (short-sightedness) or hyperopia (longsightedness). Now, wavefront technology can map 250 points on the cornea and iris in an attempt to repair vision conditions that can’t be fixed with contact lenses or glasses, such as a “halo effect” around lights.

NASA originally developed wavefront sensing technology for the Hubble Telescope.

A Times Online notes that the procedure is “one of the three most common surgical treatments in Britain”, amounting to about 100,000 people who undergo the procedure each year. According to the article, about 20 million have had it worldwide, and “an increasing number have their corneas tailored to meet specific demands.”

One doctor, Julian Stevens of Moorfields Eye Hospital, says in the article that he’s performed tailored treatment for members of the British special forces and pilots who need better vision at night.

The refractive power of a lens is measured in diopters. “Vision changes by about 0.3 diopters at night,” he said. “If you are a sniper that’s critical. It is also important for long-distance lorry drivers, who need excellent night-time distance vision.”

Professor Stephen Trokel, who first introduced the Excimer Laser to eye surgery in 1983, says in the article that he’s operated on a leading soprano (reading music) and a catcher for the New York Yankees (tracking baseballs during night games) in his New York clinic.

The development also has implications for the elderly, since the eye’s ability to focus on close objects declines with age.

But senior citizens aren’t the only ones. Middle-aged professionals in Britain are opting for “monovision,” where one eye is customized for distance vision, the other for close reading.

Even U.S. presidents are into it:

Professor Marguerite McDonald, who performed the world’s first excimer laser treatment in New Orleans in 1987, said she had received several requests from US presidential candidates: “They never wanted to look helpless on the campaign trail because they couldn’t read their notes. They wanted to send a message that they were young.”

To find out whether you too can tailor your eyesight to your lifestyle with Laser Eye Surgery, call us FREE on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Contact us Online for your free laser eye surgery assessment today.

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Sir Paul McCartney and Eye Exercises

SirPaulMcCartneySir Paul McCartney is a fan of exercises for the eyes. They won’t improve your sight but are a fun diversion.

The first step is to sit comfortably with your back and neck straight but not stiff. Then focus your gaze on the tip of your nose without blinking. Remain like this for as long as you can. Then close your eyes and relax.

 

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Laser Eye Surgery Safe Long-Term: Study (the journal Archives of Ophthalmology, November 2009)

aSwimmingLaser eye surgery doesn’t appear to have long-term effects on the cells that line the inside of the cornea, a new study has found.

The study included 29 eyes of 16 patients who had undergone either photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) or laser in situ keratomileusis (Lasik) procedures. Photos of the cells lining the cornea (endothelial cells) were taken before and nine years after surgery. The researchers compared the annual rate of corneal endothelial cell loss in the eyes of the patients who had laser surgery with 42 eyes of people who didn’t have laser eye surgery.

Nine years after laser eye surgery, the density of corneal endothelial cells was 5.3 percent less than it was before laser eye surgery. But the annual rate of cell loss (0.6 percent) was the same in patients who had laser eye surgery and those who didn’t, the researchers found.

The study findings are published in the November issue of the journal Archives of Ophthalmology.

“Our results support the findings of numerous short-term studies that found no significant endothelial cell loss after Lasik and PRK,” wrote Drs. Sanjay V. Patel and William M. Bourne, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

“The importance of the findings in our study relates to using corneas that have undergone Lasik or PRK as donor tissue,” they concluded. “Our findings of no difference in endothelial cell loss after keratorefractive surgery compared with normal eyes suggests that corneas after keratorefractive surgery should be suitable for posterior lamellar keratoplasty,” a surgical treatment that uses donated tissue to correct corneal problems.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Vision stable with PRK out to 14 years, study finds (ASN SuperSite, June, 2009)

A majority of patients followed to 14 years after PRK were satisfied with their refractive correction and maintained vision at least equal to preoperative values, according to a study.

After 14 years, manifest refraction spherical equivalent was –0.17 D in the low myopia group and –0.67 D in the high myopia group. Uncorrected visual acuity was –0.06 logMAR in the low myopia group and –0.11 logMAR in the high myopia group. Best corrected visual acuity was 0.00 logMAR in the low myopia group and –0.03 in the high myopia group.

“At the end of follow-up, 97% eyes of the low myopia group and 94% of the high myopia group had clear corneas,” the authors said.

There were no late complications noted in the study.

J Refract Surg. 2009;25(6):545-552.

Dr Nurfifi Arliani’s comment on the story: “I reviewed more than 500 eyes after 3 years of Advanced Surface Ablation and found the same result. Most doctors in my clinic prefer doing ASA than Lasik with metal blade.”

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Watch out, Lasik eye surgery (EyeWorld, October 2009)

AnEyesUpOriginally Lasik eye surgery took over PRK laser eye surgery, but in recent times, however, the scales have shifted in favor of the PRK laser eye surgery, EyeWorld reported.

PRK laser eye surgery has been increasing over the years while LASIK eye surgery volumes have been decreasing.

Dr Brian Boxer Wachler, director of Boxer Wachler Vision Institute in Los Angeles, says:” I think people have started to recognize that LASIK eye surgery has limits; more patients are being considered not good candidates for LASIK eye surgery…”.

A recent study, published in the August 2009 issue of the journal Cornea, concluded that PRK laser eye surgery may be a less invasive surgical approach for Myopia correction from a biomechanical viewpoint.

Scott Macrae, professor of ophthalmology and visual science, University of Rochester, New York, thinks the study makes sense. “When you do PRK laser eye surgery, you are less likely to weaken the cornea as much as with LASIK eye surgery because you are basically going less deep in terms of tissue removal and so there is more untouched collagen fibers with PRK laser eye surgery than with LASIK eye surgery in a comparable set of eyes.

The conservatism could be a factor in the changing landscape for refractive correction surgery. PRK volumes were found to have risen in 2008 compared with 2007 almost 50%, while the number of LASIK eye surgery cases is continuing to fall.

The study co-developer told Review of Ophthalmology, “PRK continues to go up as LASIK continues to go down.”The number of surgeons who perform LASIK eye surgery also have been dropping among American surgeons from 60% in 2000 to 41% in 2008.

(Extract from EyeWorld, The news Magazine of American Society for Cataracts and Refractive Surgery, October 2009.)

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Giving you the right sight for sore eyes (London Evening Standard)

AVeryBrightEyeLargeOn average, Londoners spend 50 hours a week staring at computer monitors, TVs, mobile phones or games consoles. But it is a myth that such exposure causes permanent damage to our eyes — you are either born with good vision or not.

However, the time we spend focusing on the same view all day can expose previously undetected eye problems. Headaches, blurred vision and extreme tiredness are all side-effects of getting too close to our screens. And young people in their twenties are particularly vulnerable to the demands placed on their vision.

One of the biggest causes of problems with our vision stems from the eyes becoming dry. This can be caused by staring at a computer screen for a long period of time.

Optometrist Brian Tompkins, a member of the British Contact Lens Association, says air-conditioning is another factor and that people simply forget to blink. Blinking is crucial for keeping the eyes lubricated. “An easy trick to remember is to blink every time you hit the return key,” says Tompkins. “People become so intensely focused they just forget, or think that if they blink they will lose their concentration.

Combined with the effect of air-conditioning, your eyes can get really dry and even inflamed.”
Weak eye muscles are another common cause of tiredness and inefficient working. Imagine your eye muscles doing press-ups hundreds of times a day and you get a sense of the strain they are under. If your muscles are sub-standard then the effort is even more tiring, says Tompkins. “A lot of people have less than average ability to focus close-up. Their eye muscles are just not up to it and the reason is genetic. Unlike other muscles, eye muscles produce involuntary movement, so exercising them doesn’t make them stronger. It’s like having to do press-ups all day.”

Another key to keeping your eyes in good shape is to take regular breaks. Staring at the horizon is an effective way of relaxing your eye muscles. That is partly why holidays are so relaxing because of the time we spend gazing at “big” skies.

Regular eye checks are a must every two years — or more frequently if you have specific problems such as short-sightedness. The days of reading letters off a chart or sitting with weighted lenses over your eyes are long gone. Today, opticians are required by law to carry out far more comprehensive checks for serious health issues such as tumours and glaucoma.

Early checks are a must to ensure poor eyesight is not left uncorrected. The Association of Optometrists (AOP) has recently launched a campaign targeted at parents to prevent lifelong visual handicaps.

A child’s vision is fully developed by the age of eight and any major changes occur at around 11, then in the late teens. Geoff Robinson, of the AOP, says: “Lots of children starting school never get their eyes tested. They don’t realise that anything is wrong because they don’t know what is normal’ and this causes all sorts of problems if they’re not properly assessed. It could be a reason why a child is underperforming at school.”

If you have to wear glasses or contact lenses from an early age there is some consolation. The natural ageing process means the crystalline lens hardens so the ability to focus up close and at middle-distance gradually reduces. So even people with “perfect” vision will have to face the optician eventually.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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CrossRoads on Laser Eye Surgery

In recent years, the laser has made an amazing impact on eye surgery. Not only are surgical procedures quicker and safer when operating with laser technology, but the healing time has been dramatically reduced from weeks or months to just days in many cases. Because of the well-advertised success of laser eye surgery, an increasing number of people have decided to toss away their glasses and undergo vision correction. In fact, almost one million people have the procedure each year. The most popular laser procedures include PRK (P-R-K) and LASIK (LAY-sick), both designed to correct nearsightedness and farsightedness, which use specialized lasers to change the shape of the cornea and restore perfect vision without the need for glasses or contacts. Lasers are also involved in other eye surgeries, such as cataract removal, glaucoma treatment, and cosmetic improvements. Scientists are constantly searching for new applications of lasers in all areas of medicine but, so far, their use in the optical arena has created the most excitement. Lasers were first used in eye surgeries on an experimental basis in the early 1980’s. In 1995, the FDA (F-D-A) approved the use of laser systems in the U.S. Since then, the advancement of laser technology and surgical precision has allowed lasers to become the treatment of choice for many major eye problems. Both doctors and patients have become increasingly confident of laser surgery, thanks to the dramatic results. Although laser surgery can’t always be completely successful and isn’t appropriate for everyone, it enjoys a great success rate.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Surgery gives gift of ‘HD’ sight (Sky News, 4 December 2009)
  • Implanted lens can be fine-tuned
  • Procedure gives ‘better than 20/20 vision’

PATIENTS are having their eyes fitted with an artificial lens that allows them to see in “high definition”.

Surgeons begin the process by implanting the lens into the eye using the standard procedure for cataracts.

Then, for the first time in Britain, they can fine-tune the focus of the lens several days later.

The technique gives patients vision so sharp that it is even better than 20/20 – the best an adult can usually hope for.

Bobby Qureshi, the first ophthalmic surgeon in the UK to use the lens, described it as “a hugely significant development”.

It can correct both cataracts and the long-sightedness that usually comes with age.

The lens is made from a special light-sensitive silicone.

By shining ultraviolet light on specific parts of the lens, surgeons can change its shape and curvature, sharpening the image seen by the patient.

Mr Qureshi told Sky News: “We have the potential here to change patients’ vision to how it was when they were young.

“The change is so accurate that we can even make the lens bifocal or varifocal, so as well as giving them good vision at distance we can give them good vision for reading.

“They won’t need their glasses at all.”

The technique can overcome tiny defects in the eye that cause visual distortions.

The lens can be adjusted several times over a period of days until patients have perfect vision.

A final blast of light then permanently fixes the lenses’ shape.

Gill Balfour was one of the first patients to be fitted with the new lens at the Spire Gatwick Park Hospital, Surrey, England.

She had the first signs of cataracts and other vision problems.

She said: “It’s absolutely incredible. To think it’s been tailor-made for you, matching any imperfections. It’s the way forward, isn’t it?”

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Take this Vision Quiz to see if you need an appointment to see us

Visit www.quiztron.com to take an eye sight quiz and then call Medownick Laser Clinic to make a Free No obligation assessment to see how we can improve your vision.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Test your Vision with CaleidoMaze

AColourVisionTestCaleidoMaze

Test your color perception with this CaleidoMaze from ReadersDigest.ca.

This maze is a test of your colour perception. You may only travel from a pink block to a yellow one, from a yellow block to a blue one, from a blue block to a green one, and from a green block to a pink one on your way to the destination.

The Challenge:

Travel to the centre from any point outside the circle. You do not have to start at a pink square, but you must follow the correct colour sequence. Diagonal moves are not allowed.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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My ReStored Eyes – American Ophthalmologist talks about Multi-Focal IOLs in his eyes (10 October 2009)

What I’ve Learned  

Even though I’ve been involved with multifocal intraocular lenses for over 20 years, it is amazing what I’ve been able to learn in the past three weeks from my own experience with having multifocal lenses in my eyes.

20/20 isn’t 20/20

One of the remarkable things about my experience has been that prior to the surgery my vision with both eyes was 20/20- when measuring both eyes together.  The vision in my left eye was 20/40- and the right eye was 20/20-.  However, my experience has been that the quality of my vision since the surgery has improved enormously, far better than I can remember it for many years.  Colors simply “pop”.  The definition or contrast is truly remarkable.  Road Signs, which before were visible, now simply jump out.  My depth perception has increased enormously.  The term high definition is passed around carelessly these days.  But, that’s the term that keeps coming to my mind when I think about the increased quality of vision that I have.  One way of thinking about this is the difference in vision with polarizing sunglasses.  Depth increases and quality improves.

Lifestyle Complaints

All of us have had the experience of speaking with patients who have not realized how much their lifestyles have been compromised by their decreased vision.  The improvement in my vision has been remarkable.  Along with that improvement, has been an increase in my comfort level with certain activities.  Night vision is the area that I notice this the most.  I used to enjoy driving at night.  However, over the years, I had not realized how much I had cut back on my night time driving.  This was not a conscious decision, but simply an adaptation I made in response to the decreased quality of vision that I was experiencing.  Now night time driving is again a delight.  Road signs are crisp, depth is improved and rainy weather is no longer an issue.  I am now more diligent in exploring with my patients what kind of compromises they have created in their own lives to adjust to the changes caused by cataracts.

Side Effects

                  Halos
                     
Initially, halos were very noticeable, but resolved quickly (within 24 hours).  Now halos are only noticeable under specific lighting conditions :  halogen headlights, some street lights and certain traffic lights.  The halos, however, are not intrusive.  Frankly, if it weren’t for the fact that I know some patients find them bothersome, I probably wouldn’t even notice them.

 

                      Glare
Glare is rare and usually only occurs when the sun is low in the sky and oblique to my vision.  Waxy vision occurred early on, but resolved quickly.  I think, in my own experience, this is related to the size of the pupil.  It may be that patients with larger pupils are more susceptible to this phenomenon.

 

                       Yellowing Vision
I have no perception of yellow vision at all, even when only one eye was done.  In fact, colors appear truer than they did previously, and I find that I can differentiate subtle things, like the color of my socks.  One of the issues that I had when the cataracts were developing was differentiating dark blues from blacks and dark browns.  That is no longer a problem.

 

                   Side Shadows or Light
Many of us who do a lot of these lenses have heard patients describe side shadows associated with the lenses.  I have not had that experience.  However, I have noticed that when overhead lights are in a certain location with respect to my eye, I can see some “rays” in the periphery of my vision.  This has become less noticeable and, again, is not intrusive.

 

One of the important lessons about side effects is to inform patients in advance about the possibility of these side effects and the fact that these side effects will significantly improve with time.  One of the things that I tell my patients is that just as patients initially notice the presence of a bifocal in their bifocal glasses, as they become presbyopic, in time they learn to neuro adapt to the bifocal and end up not noticing it at all.  Frankly, having worn bifocals and now having multifocal implants, the presence of the side effects from the multifocal implant are much less intrusive than what bifocals were. 

Mono Correction

Some surgeons who I greatly respect have strongly recommended mono correction to multifocal lenses.  As a very successful mono correction contact lens wearer for almost 20 years, I can tell you that the quality of vision with the multifocal lens compared to mono correction is far superior.  In fact, the vision with mono correction is not even in the same ball park.  My depth perception and stereopsis, the quality of my reading and my quality of my distance vision is far superior than it ever was with mono correction contacts.  I would be very reluctant to recommend mono correction to my patients.  In fact, while I used to do a lot of mono correction, I believe I will now move more and more toward multifocals.

Contacts

One of the remarkable things about my experience has been vision without contacts.  I have been a very successful contact lens wearer for over thirty years.  In fact, I firmly believe that I was totally unaware of the presence of contacts in my eyes.  However, the feeling of excellent vision without contacts is a remarkable experience.  The best simile that I can think of is the difference between swimming with a bathing suit and skinny dipping.  (Of course, these days it’s more likely for me to be “chunky dunking”.)  The quality of my vision is superior than it was with my contacts, and the feeling of freedom and nothing on the surface of the eye is truly a great feeling.

Surface Disease

The quality of my vision improves enormously when the surface of the eye is adequately lubricated.  The use of tears greatly improves the quality of my vision,

These are the major points that I’ve learned so far. 

Dr W. Martin
14/10/2009

To find out whether you too can ReStore your Vision, call us FREE on 1800 DR EYES
(1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or
Contact us Online today.

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Study shows spike in myopia prevalence from 1971 to 2004 (Arch Ophthalmology. 2009;127(12))

The prevalence of myopia in the United States increased appreciably between 1971 and 2004, according to a study.

Study data suggested significant economic and health policy implications, the study authors said.

“Although myopia can be treated relatively easily with corrective lenses, it engenders substantial expenditures on a population basis owing to its high prevalence,” they said. “If 25% of those aged 12 to 54 years had myopia, the associated annual cost would be more than $2 billion; an increase in prevalence to 37% would increase the cost to more than $3 billion.”

The study included 4,436 patients participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 1971 to 1972 and 8,339 patients participating in the same survey from 1999 to 2004. The survey examination is conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In the survey taking place from 1971 to 1972, examination involved a pinhole test to estimate corrected visual acuity in patients with presenting visual acuity worse than 20/20. Detailed retinoscopy was performed in eyes with presenting visual acuity of 20/50 or worse.

In the survey from 1999 to 2004, most participants underwent refraction. However, right eyes were classified as myopic or nonmyopic according to methods similar to those used earlier. Autorefraction was used instead of retinoscopy to measure objective refraction. Lensometry was not performed on contact lens wearers.

Study data showed that the overall prevalence of myopia among participants aged 12 to 54 years was 25% in 1971 to 1972 and 41.6% in 1999 to 2004. The difference was statistically significant (P < .001). The prevalence of myopia among African American participants was 13% in 1971 to 1972 and 33.5% in 1999 to 2004. The prevalence among white participants rose from 26.3% to 43%. Both differences were statistically significant ( P < .001). Other studies have attributed rising myopia among younger populations to burgeoning environmental factors, the authors said. To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Expert hopes ‘fourth-generation’ refractive procedures address limitations of LASIK, surface ablation

NEW ORLEANS — The next generation of corneal refractive surgery is going back to the surface in an effort to resolve surgical limitations of conventional PRK, LASIK and LASEK, according to a keynote lecturer here.

Speaking at the Refractive Subspecialty Day preceding the American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting here, John Marshall, PhD, explained his belief in the fourth generation of corneal refractive surgery.

The three previous generations include early PRK, LASIK, and then LASEK and epi-LASEK, he said. Each of these techniques has its own limitations, he said.

In an effort to chronicle the limitations of conventional surgical techniques, Dr. Marshall said he and his colleagues have begun to study the effect of PRK, LASEK and LASIK at 4 to 6 weeks after surgery on human tissue by using a culture model. He said most research to date has been limited to rabbit or monkey corneas.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Myopic patients report quality of life similar to emmetropes after Refractive Surgery

Ocular Surgery News Supersite reports on October, 2007 that using either spectacles or contact lenses to correct myopia can negatively affect some areas of patients’ vision-related quality of life, researchers in Australia said. However, patients who received refractive surgery reported quality of life similar to emmetropic individuals, they noted.

Christine Y. Chen, MBBS, and colleagues used the Vision Quality of Life Index to compare vision-related quality of life between 64 emmetropic individuals, 65 myopic patients who received refractive surgery and 66 myopic patients who wore spectacles or contact lenses.

All study participants were 18 years or older, had a visual acuity of at least 20/40 and had no other ocular pathology, the authors noted.

The researchers found no significant differences in the vision-related quality of life between myopic patients who received refractive surgery and those with emmetropia.

“In contrast, the spectacle and/or contact lens group had significantly increased odds of having concerns about injuring themselves (odds ratio=11.5), difficulties coping with demands in life (odds ratio=23.6), difficulties fulfilling roles (odds ratio=5.6) and less confidence joining in everyday activities (odds ratio=30.6) compared to emmetropes,” they said.

“The potential improvement in vision-related quality of life should be considered when recommending treatment for myopia,” they added.

The study is published in the October issue of Journal of Refractive Surgery.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Can eating carrots improve your eyesight? (ABC Health)

There are endless food myths parents use every day to get their children to eat nutritious food – ‘spinach will make you strong like Popeye’, ‘an apple a day keeps the doctor away’ and ‘eating carrots helps you see in the dark’.

A major Australian study called the Blue Mountains eye study, conducted in the late 1990s, examined the link between increased vitamin A intake and deteriorating night vision in older people. The authors found that people who reported having poor eyesight ate more carrots – just as their mothers had told them – to improve their eyesight. But it didn’t help.

While there is some truth to the old wives’ tale regarding carrots and eyesight, Professor Algis Vingrys, from the University of Melbourne’s Department of Optometry and Vision Services, says no amount of carrots will improve your eyesight if you already have a well balanced diet.

A diet with sufficient vitamin A, iron and other provitamins (substances that our bodies can convert into vitamins) is vital for eye health.

There are two types of vitamin A: retinoids and carotenoids.

Retinoids are a lipid form of vitamin A found in liver, fish oils containing liver (eg cod-liver oil) and butter. Eating large amounts of these substances can give you an overdose of vitamin A and lead to toxicity, or worse, promote some forms of cancer.

Carotenoids are provitamins your body converts into vitamin A. Carrots, broccoli, sweet potatoes, pumpkin and dark-green leafy vegetables all contain beta-carotene, a potent carotenoid. But how much gets converted depends on how much vitamin A you already have in your body – in other words, your body doesn’t make vitamin A if you don’t need it.

A diet deficient in vitamin A can lead to night blindness and other eye problems. Reduced night vision is one of the earliest signs of vitamin A deficiency although people rarely complain of night blindness until it becomes really severe.

But vitamin A deficiency is rare in Australia. Most of us eat a reasonably balanced diet, although pregnant women, those who don’t eat a varied nutritious diet and some people with bowel disease may need to see their doctor if they feel they are at risk.

Eating carrots (and other sources of vitamin A) can improve night vision if you are deficient in vitamin A, (you also need to be getting enough zinc and iron) but not if you already have a balanced diet.

The vision loss reported by the people in the Blue Mountains eye study was caused by age-related deterioration not a dietary deficiency, which is why their eyesight didn’t improve regardless of how many carrots they chomped on.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Eye Exercises and Vision for your IPhone – vision AppZap
an Eye App for Iphone

an Eye App for Iphone

Vision is one of the most valuable things for all us. We get about 80% of all information through vision. Unfortunately about one third of all people have vision-related problems. New application for IPhone can help you to test and preserve your vision. It also offers some fun content that you can enjoy in your spare time.

There are simple exercises which helps to remove stress from your eyes.

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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Should Laser Eye Surgery Be Considered a Performance Enhancer?

1st March 2010 By Jeremy Taylor (Asylum for All Mankind)

Shaun BotterillOne of the big differences between the Winter Olympics and the Summer Olympics is there is much less chatter about performance-enhancing drugs in the colder version. (Insert joke about snowboarders and marijuana here.)

However, as our friends at With Leather uncovered, U.S. gold medal–winning bobsledder Steven Holcomb copped to getting corrective laser eye surgery a couple years ago. Ironically, Holcomb claims his clearer vision made it harder for him to race with his “instinctive style,” but the motivation for top-flight athletes to get their eyes zapped is clearly to improve their performance.

Many baseball players and golfers swear by laser eye surgery, and usually get their vision set to better than 20/20.

So why isn’t this effort to use technology to impart superhuman abilities considered cheating?

When an athlete gets Laser Eye Surgery, is he cheating?

To discuss how we can improve your Vision with Laser Eye Surgery, call us on 1800 DR EYES (1800 37 3937) to talk to one of our Patient Care Team now or Book Online for your FREE Laser Eye Surgery assessment today.

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